Eight Reasons Why Waring Endterm Rocks

This spring, Waring students built a skiff, interviewed political candidates, created a video game, wrote novellas, sewed rompers, travelled to Canada, designed theater sets, programmed robots, studied the World Cup, recreated historical photographs, and pondered the good life as part of a three-week Endterm for grades 6-10. The term is intensive, experiential, and often involves off-campus or travel experiences.

What makes it great? Why does it fit Waring’s core philosophy?

In their own words, eight Waring students explain why:

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1. Follow your passion
“If it’s something that you really like, that you’re passionate about, you’re able to do that thing every single day, all day, for three weeks. Having more time to focus on your passion–it feels really good to be able to get it all out.” – Kira Baxter ’22

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2. Learn with professionals
“We had this chance to go and use Harvard’s machines in labs that so many people want to go to. We got to go there as high school and middle school students. It was a really unique opportunity.” – Phoebe Holz ’20

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3. Work as a team
“You don’t see all the progress that has been done in one day because you’re just focused on your one part. But at the end of the day, when we put everything together, you can really see the boat coming to shape. It’s a super cool experience because it’s not just you building a boat. It’s a group of people working together to build a boat.  – Cole Ferguson Sauder ’21

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4. Develop new skills
“In regular school, you’re working for one hour on humanities, an hour on writing or math, but now, during Endterm, it’s one category for the entire three weeks. It’s really fun to see yourself develop in that field a lot in just a short time.” – Benny Weedon ’20

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5. More experiences, less tests
“Instead of ending with finals or more classes, we end class early and have this intensive, which I think is very Waring. Instead of ending with a bunch of standardized tests, we focus in on a different topic and you can go explore it.” – Henry Symes ’20

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6. Learn by doing
“We try and figure it out on our own. They let us make mistakes and let us learn from them. It’s a really awesome way for me to learn, and it’s taught me that in the future, when I want to teach people things, this is a really awesome way to do it. – Claire Rhyneer ’21

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7. Discover new talents
“When I was in sixth grade and just starting Waring, I was very tentative to try anything artsy, but Endterm helped me discover my strengths and interests. I realized there was a lot more to art than just black and white pencil. I realized my strength was actually poetry and watercolor. Knowing that made me realize that there is a lot more to art and writing that I had no clue about and that I might actually be very talented in.” – Ilaria Bardini ’20

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8. Promote camaraderie between groups
“Endterm is mixed age in a similar way to Tutorial. It’s to promote camaraderie between a sixth grader and say a sophomore… It’s only in these settings that a sixth grader could get critiqued on their work by a freshman – or the other way around.” – Campbell Boisvert ’20

The Brick Wolves: Waring’s First Lego League Team by Francis Schaeffer

On December 9, 2017, Waring’s First Lego League Team, the Brick Wolves, headed off to Revere High School for a day of competition. Fourteen nervous students, two teachers (Erin Thomassen and me), along with several parents, and lots of Lego, traveled south from Waring on a cold, snowy, Saturday.

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Our journey toward the Revere tournament started in early August when many students came in to assemble our playing field, make the mission models, and build Waring’s first batch of Lego Mindstorm’s robots. Once the school year started Erin and I taught the students how to program in the EV3-G language used by the robots. We knew we would be up against teams with lots of experience and we would all be newbies. So, we scrambled to learn the language, came in for multiple full-day sessions on Saturdays and got our selves from zero to ready in 3 months.

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When we arrived at Revere High we pulled out our carefully packed tubs holding the precious, student-built and programmed robots, and headed into the gymnasium where the other 25 teams awaited. It was a hectic day, but we learned a lot and had fun. When we ran our robots for the judges, we scored lots of points, but during the meet our robots had problems. Our teams placed in the 10th and 11th spots in the meet, receiving awards for our work, but we missed the cut off to move on in the competition by one spot.

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Now that the official FLL season is over, we are running our own internal competition. We took apart our old robots, divided into seven teams of two and are in the midst of our own contest. The kids are almost done building their new robots and will start to write new code for them. We look forward to taking what we learned during the official FLL season and incorporating it into our new batch of robots and code!

Earth Science at Singing Beach, by John Wigglesworth

170621c-waring-0202.jpgWaring is a school that thrives on the challenge of blending innovation with tradition. The things we do such as, Camping Trip, All-School Meeting, Tutorial, and Soirées are part of our past but equally critical to our future if we are to remain true to our soul and culture as a school. To keep these programs fresh we continually try to think differently about them, cautious of the status quo. All areas of our program are in the constant effort to be innovative with tradition; and one example is the Earth Science Program for Group 1. This fall marks the 15th year of the Singing Beach Project. In that Earth Science helps students understand how the spheres of the land, the ocean, and the atmosphere interact to make our planet function as it does, studying the impact of seasonal weather on the profile of Singing Beach has been a tradition of the Group 1 science for many years. What better place to study to the interaction of land, ocean and weather than the beach?

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In September of each year since 2002, Group 1 science sections use their lab period to conduct a transect study of the beach from the backshore, across the berm, to the waters edge. Along their transect they measure the change in elevation of the beach at 2 meter intervals. Using the computer lab at school and Excel spreadsheets, the students use their measure of the cumulative change in elevation to graph the profile of the beach. In addition they collect sand at the berm and use the Wentworth Sediment scale to evaluate the size and composition of a 100 grams of the sample. In April, students replicate their transect, graph a spring profile of the beach, and collect a spring sample of sand. Students compare and contrast the Fall to the Spring data in a formal lab report and poster presentation. Year after year, the Singing Beach Project gives the 8th grade students the opportunity to participate in authentic research. “What is the effect of seasonal weather on the profile of the beach?” is a real research question. Conducting transects imagejpeg_2on the beach is collecting real data and making sense of the weather conditions over the school year is an ongoing effort to blend observation of the sky with interpretation of weather maps and weather reports. Collecting, organizing, displaying, interpreting, and presenting data is the goal of any statistics course.

Over the years, I have observed the pattern of the beach profile to be consistent with the concept of winter and summer beach; that is, each winter, weather and wave energy is such that it tends to erode the berm and transport the sand offshore and in the summer the more gentile wave energy tends to transport sand toward the beach and build up the berm once again.

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The Singing Beach Project is a Waring tradition and after 15 years of bringing innovation and energy to the project to keep it fresh, I am pleased that The Waring Industrial Park (WIP) has become a reality. The WIP will offer new opportunities for this right of passage within the eighth grade science program.

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Not only can we simulate winter and summer beach with our wave tank, we can also use our 3D software and printers to make a model of the beach that will complement our 2 dimensional profiles.

Blending innovation with tradition, thinking differently about how to do the same thing, and doing real work is something that I see happening in every room and in every nook and cranny of the Waring campus. It is exciting to be a teacher here.